Recommendations of what to see in the Vienna art scene this month by our local guide, Itai Margula. Discover more on a private art tour!

 

I.

Exhibition: Rachel Whiteread
Artist: Rachel Whiteread
Venue:  Belvedere 21
Dates: Until July 29th, 2018


Rachel Whiteread was commissioned by the city of Vienna to design the Holocaust Memorial at Judenplatz, and although it was supposed to be finished in 1996, the unveiling of the monument took place in October 2000. With this monument, the British artist left a lasting mark on the city and transformed the discourse surrounding remembrance. It then took another eighteen years to have the first solo exhibition of the artist in a museum. This exhibition was made possible by Belvedere 21 together with Tate Britain, London, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., in cooperation with the Saint Louis Art Museum.

 Untitled (stairs) ©Alexandra Matzner for ARTinWORDS

Untitled (stairs) ©Alexandra Matzner for ARTinWORDS

II.

Exhibition: Cécile B. Evans AMOS' WORLD: Episode One
Artist: Cécile B. Evans
Venue: Mumok
Dates: Until July 1st, 2018 

For her show at mumok, Cecile B. Evans creates an architectural video installation. Conceived as a television show set in a socially progressive housing estate, the latest work of the artist: AMO’S WORLD: episode one, is a post-internet dystopia, dealing amongst other things, with the ever greater role technology takes on our feelings and perception. The exhibition is curated by Marianne Dobner.

 AMO’S WORLD, 2017 video still, courtesy of the artist and Galerie Emanuel Layr Vienna/Rome

AMO’S WORLD, 2017 video still, courtesy of the artist and Galerie Emanuel Layr Vienna/Rome

III.

Exhibition: Teddy Kollek. The Viennese mayor of Jerusalem
Artists: curated by Marcus Patka and Elke-Vera Kotowski
Venue: Jewish Museum Vienna
Dates: April 11th, 2018 until November 25th, 2018

 
Teddy Kollek was the mayor of Jerusalem for almost thirty years (1965 to 1993). Growing up in Vienna, Kollek left Austria at 24, heading towards Palestine in 1935. His life journey marks the constantly worsening conditions in Vienna before the Anschluss. However, Kollek had always stayed in contact with his former home country and helped build bridges between Austria and Israel. Even the long history of the Jewish Museum is connected to Kollek, but you can find out more by visiting the exhibition curated by Marcus Patka and Elke-Vera Kotowski. 

 © David Rubinger, YEDIOTH AHARONOT

© David Rubinger, YEDIOTH AHARONOT