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72 Hours In

72 Hours in Jerusalem

72 Hours in Jerusalem

To most people, Jerusalem is known as a travel destination because of the many holy sites located there. The Western Wall, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, the Dome of the Rock and other well-known historical sites are the biggest draws however there is also a thriving contemporary art scene in Jerusalem that is too often overlooked. We’ve compiled this 72 hour guide for those looking to explore another side of the holy city. Visit these insider haunts in real life with Oh So Arty guide and founder of Contemporary Art in Jerusalem Jenna Romano on an art tour.

Jenna Romano (right) with artist Sivan Pais in front of her work

Jenna Romano (right) with artist Sivan Pais in front of her work

The start to any good getaway is finding the right accommodations. If you’re in search of a more modern space check out Jerusalem’s latest boutique hotel Villa Brown. While staying at Villa Brown treat yourself to cocktails at the fashionable underground Cave Bar that was previously a water cistern in the 19th century. Jerusalem is full of chic boutique hotels and one of our current favorites is The American Colony Hotel which is located near the city center. It has a rich history with previous guests including Lawrence of Arabia, Winston Churchill and Bob Dylan. A stone’s throw from the walls of the Old City is the luxurious Mamilla Hotel which boasts an indoor swimming pool, a relaxing spa and a rooftop restaurant with breath-taking views of Jerusalem.

The American Colony Hotel

The American Colony Hotel

Nearby the Mamilla hotel is the cosmopolitan Alrov Mamilla Avenue which is lined with shops. This open air street mall has a lot of great retail options that are enjoyed by both tourists and locals. For an authentic shopping experience we also recommend the old city bazaar. The bazaar in the Arab Quarter has a really unique feel and sells objects equally special. Make sure you’re prepared to barter when shopping in these markets! Shatz Street is one of Jenna’s favorite destinations for shopping. It is located close to the city center and has a mix of European and Middle Eastern influence. We recommend visiting on Fridays when there is a outdoor design market and enjoying a coffee at Cafe Bezalel.

While the Old City is a wealth of history worth exploring it is also often congested with tourists. We prefer to explore off the beaten track in the Jerusalem neighborhood of Musrara. This is currently one of Jenna’s favorite neighborhoods in part because of its diverse demographic, she said the, “residents continue to be linchpins to the more diverse cultural dialogue in Jerusalem.” This unique cultural tapestry can be seen in the beautiful architecture of Musrara which still maintains original Arabic tiles, high ceilings and huge courtyards.

Jenna leading an art tour in Jerusalem

Jenna leading an art tour in Jerusalem

Just outside of Nachlaot is the cutting edge non-profit art space Barbur Gallery founded by a group of Bezalel Art School graduates in 2005. If you are travelling to Jerusalem it’s worth checking out the gallery for their monthly exhibition programs and frequent events such as screenings, workshops and lectures.If you’re interested in learning more about the gallery scene make sure to join local tours with Jenna who can provide insider access to studios, artists spaces and more.

A work by Robert Indiana in the sculpture garden at The Israel Museum

A work by Robert Indiana in the sculpture garden at The Israel Museum

You cannot fully experience the artistic side of Jerusalem without a visit to the largest cultural institution in Israel, The Israel Museum which was founded in 1965 and has unparalleled collections of art and archaeology. In addition to historic artifacts like the Dead Sea Scrolls the museum also hosts frequent exhibitions of modern and contemporary art including shows such as Ai Wei Wei and Zoya Cherkassky. One of the museum’s highlights is the stunning sculpture garden designed by famous Japanese sculptor Isamu Noguchi which features the work of international artists like Sol Lewitt, Donald Judd and Pablo Piccaso. After a long day of touring Jenna recommends grabbing some hummus at Hummus Lina and a drink at the chic Zuta Cocktail Bar.

Zuta cocktail bar

Zuta cocktail bar

In between visiting these arty destinations you can be sure to stay satiated with all the amazing culinary options available to you. The best destination to get a true taste of Jerusalem is the famous Mahane Yehuda Market, Jerusalem’s massive outdoor food market with all the best local fare. Jenna recommends venturing a few steps beyond the beaten path onto HaEshkol Street for the open market and a more authentic experience. She said, “Between HaEshkol St. and Beit Yaakov St., and every corner in between, this small area contains local gems—a variety of delicious street food, gourmet restaurants, dessert options and hip bars.”

Food off the market. Photo by Mushkie Haskelevich

Food off the market. Photo by Mushkie Haskelevich

Jenna’s insider tip is to visit Gan HaPaamon (Liberty Bell Park) that is often overlooked by tourists. While you’re enjoying the greenery look for the ten sculptures hidden throughout the park. You will find works by local and international artists such as Henry Moore, Igael Tumarkin, and Israel HaDany.

The best way to conclude your stay in Jerusalem is with an evening at the Jerusalem Artists’ House. It is located in a historic stone building that was formerly the home of the Bezalel Academy for Arts and Design. Since 1965 the Jerusalem Artists’ House has hosted exhibitions of both Israeli and international artists and other activities. Once you’ve had your fill of local and international artwork visit the on-site restaurant, Mona Restaurant. Explore it all with us on an Oh So Arty tour!

The Jerusalem Artist’s House and Mona Restaurant

The Jerusalem Artist’s House and Mona Restaurant

72 Hours in Tel Aviv

72 Hours in Tel Aviv

Oh So Arty was founded in Tel Aviv and so it will always have a special place in our hearts. This coastal metropolis boasts the best of both worlds offering a bustling city life balanced with the calm beauty of the Mediterranean seaside. Founded in just 1909, Tel Aviv is still a young city that has carved out a space for itself as the country’s bohemian center offering the best in technology and culture. This Spring Tel Aviv has become a destination for people from all over the world as it hosts the Eurovision song contest in May and celebrates 100 years of the Bauhaus school. There is no better way to experience the diverse art scene in Tel Aviv than on one of our gallery or street art tours which explore the evolving identity of the city. Keep reading for the best ways to spend 72 hours in Tel Aviv or book an art tour here.

An Oh So Arty tour at Miriam Cabess’a Tel Aviv studio.  Photo by Pavlina Schultz.

An Oh So Arty tour at Miriam Cabess’a Tel Aviv studio.

Photo by Pavlina Schultz.

When it comes to finding suitable lodgings in Tel Aviv there are a bevy of expertly designed boutique hotels that offer luxurious amenities and comforts. The Hotel Montefiore and Hotel Nordoy make our list for unique boutique hotels options. The renowned brunch at the Hotel Montefiore is a must for all travellers to the city whether staying there or not. Innovative takes on culinary staples such as toasted challah bread are not to be missed. While The Hotel Nordoy centrally located near the Nachlat Binyamin weekly craft market offers a first rate spa experience. Treat yourself to a luxurious massage on the hotel’s panoramic rooftop! If you prefer to stay in Jaffa we cannot recommend The Setai enough. This luxurious new complex offers rooftop pool and unbeatable views of the sea.

Hotel Montefiore. Photo by Sivan Askayo.

Hotel Montefiore. Photo by Sivan Askayo.

Having settled on your ideal home base it’s time to explore the city by foot or by cycle! One of the best ways to spend an afternoon in Tel Aviv is by leisurely strolling its verdant boulevards, stopping by the cute kiosks for a coffee and taking in the fabulous Bauhaus architecture. Often referred to as The White City Tel Aviv has the largest number of Bauhaus buildings in the world making a UNESCO World Heritage Site. For architecture aficionados we recommend a visit to the Bauhaus Center Tel Aviv to explore their permanent collection dedicated to the subject.

The Hotel Nordoy. Photo by Assaf Pinchuk.

The Hotel Nordoy. Photo by Assaf Pinchuk.

Take advantage of the local designers available in the city. One of our favorite boutiques is Aviva Zilberman located in a chic storefront in central Tel Aviv. Also be sure to check out Hibino for interior options, Maria Berman for timeless fashion looks, and Greek Sandals Official for the best shoes around.

There are many fantastic culinary offerings in Tel Aviv. For Thursday nights we recommend dinner at famed Israeli chef Eyal Shani’s restaurant North Abraxas. Known for his unique twists on vegetables, Shani’s restaurants are favorites among locals. Make sure to order the cauliflower to experience one of Shani’s most revered dishes! Close out the night with drinks at Nilus. This stylish bar is located in an old hotel and radiates a timeless energy.

Aviva Zilberman boutique located at 23 Meltchet street.

Aviva Zilberman boutique located at 23 Meltchet street.

Friday mornings are best spent grabbing hummus and soaking up the Middle Eastern vibes offered at the Carmel Market. Start your morning with some classic Israeli cuisine and great coffee at Yom Tov Cafe and get ready to explore the city’s art scene. The Tel Aviv Museum of Art is the best place to discover Israeli art history. The new building designed by Preston Scott Cohen is a real gem and offers a strong overview of art from Israel. If you’re looking to immerse yourself in the city’s contemporary art scene you have to head to the southern areas of Tel Aviv where most of the galleries have relocated in past years. The South of Tel Aviv has many industrial spaces and where most galleries are located today, due to relatively cheap rents, proximity to the artists’ studios and suitable spaces. We love to frequent Dvir Gallery, Alon Segev Gallery and Rosenfeld Contemporary Art for their unique roster of artists and intriguing exhibition programming. You’ll probably find yourself totally enamored of the Israeli art scene and it’s never been easier to collect artwork by contemporary artists from Israel! Art Source is an online platform (founded by two local art professionals- Michal Freedman and Oh So Arty founder Sarah Peguine) for discovering the best Israeli artists and collecting their work. Visit the Art Source website, read the online magazine and follow their Instagram page to learn more!

Rosenfeld Contemporary Art. Photo by Sophie Weinstein.

Rosenfeld Contemporary Art. Photo by Sophie Weinstein.

Teder is an awesome bar and online radio station that also serves up generously sized pizzas. If you’re looking for more food just head upstairs to Romano, another Eyal Shani restaurant. On Friday nights they push the tables back and local DJ’s spin until the early hours of Saturday morning.

Romano. Photo by Ariel Efron.

Romano. Photo by Ariel Efron.

In Tel Aviv Saturdays are all about the beach. Tel Avivians love living along the sea and on weekends they flock to the long coastline to recharge before the week ahead! Start your Saturday morning slowly with a stroll through Neve Tzedek, a quaint neighborhood with French influence boasting charming cafes and boutiques. Then make your way to Old Jaffa for one our favorite beaches and a fresh juice at one of the many juice stalls located in the Shuk Hapishpeshim. The Jaffa art scene also has a lot to offer in terms of contemporary art with the newly opened Magasin III and creative hub Beit Kandinoff. Complete your trip to Tel Aviv by booking a private art tour with Oh So Arty for an insider perspective on the White City.

Sarah Peguine leading an art tour at Dvir Gallery.

Sarah Peguine leading an art tour at Dvir Gallery.

To book a private art tour in Tel Aviv please click here.

72 Hours in Rome

72 Hours in Rome

In the Italian capital city of Rome, we found the perfect balance between old and new. Historic and contemporary. One minute we were walking through the Villa de Medici and the next we were taking in the impressive contemporary art scene at some of the city’s best galleries. Keep reading to hear about how we spent 72 Hours in Rome and a list of our favorite arty destinations around town!

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Checking in on Friday evening at Hotel del Barbieri set the perfect mood for our weekend getaway. The building was originally constructed in the 17th century and was renovated in 2017. Located within one of the city’s most central districts this cozy boutique hotel couldn’t be in a better spot!

Hotel del Barbieri.

Hotel del Barbieri.

Rome has a bustling Jewish quarter with synagogues and ample food options. For our first night we chose to have dinner at Al Pompiere in the Jewish quarter. Offering high quality traditional food we stuffed ourselves on tagliatelle and their famed fried artichoke. We then called it a night and went back to our hotel to prepare for a day of art touring!

On Saturday morning we met Oh So Arty local insider in Rome, Valentina Di Pietro. Her modern and contemporary art tours of Rome show a different side of the eternal city who’s grand beauty was built through layers and layers of history. We began our tour at the centrally located White Noise Gallery where we caught a solo exhibition of Spanish artist Jesús Herrera Martínez’s new cycle of works entitled “Taking Care of the Garden of Eden”. This emerging space had a nice program of exhibitions and a passionate and committed gallery team. We then visited the nearby Galleria Lorcan O’Neill to view a solo show of new works by Eddie Peake. The rainbow of colors in this show were thrilling to see in person and the gallery space was very beautiful.

Eddie Peake at Galleria Lorcan O’Neill

Eddie Peake at Galleria Lorcan O’Neill

Next up was the funky bohemian neighborhood of Trastevere. This is the perfect alternative escape if you need respite from tourist venues like the Trevi fountain and Colosseum. Valentina took us to T293 Gallery to see Claire Fontaine’s powerful solo show ‘Tutto e commune’ or ‘Everything is Connected’. Next up was Gavin Brown’s Enterprise, originally a New York insitution, which opened a in Rome a few years ago in an 8th-century church named Sant’Andrea de Scaphis at Via dei Vascellari 69 in the Trastevere neighborhood. The juxtaposition of this old architecture with radical contemporary art makes for a very exciting visual experience.

Claire Fontaine at T293 Gallery

Claire Fontaine at T293 Gallery

We then made our way to the San Lorenzo neighborhood. This is where the university is located and so it’s very full of life and vibrant. We took a brief coffee break at the hip eatery Fauno 3.0. Then Valentina used her insider connections to take us on studio visits around the neighborhood. First up was the established artist Pietro Ruffo. His work is primarily concerned with exploring the nature of freedom and offers important social commentary with beautiful aesthetics. Next was the studio of emerging artist Leonardo Petrucci who studied at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Rome. We are so grateful to Valentina, Pietro and Leonardo as well as the galleries and other artists we met for opening their doors to us and sharing an arty side of Rome not typically available to travelers. After a long day of exploring Rome’s arty side the only thing left to do was grab some sweets at Gelateria Dei Gracchi!

Pietro Ruffo in his studio. Photo by Sarah Peguine.

Pietro Ruffo in his studio. Photo by Sarah Peguine.

For dinner we feasted at Al Gran Sasso which served up traditional Roman food and homemade pasta!

We began our last day at the National Museum of 21st Century Arts or MAXXI. The striking modernist building was designed by the late architect Zaha Hadid. This institution is the first Italian national institution dedicated to contemporary art. It was founded in 2009 as a laboratory for cultural experimentation and innovation.

MAXXI. Photo by Kef Israel.

MAXXI. Photo by Kef Israel.

You can’t visit Rome without indulging in some pizza! So after touring MAXXI we visited Bonci Pizza infamous for their Roman-style pizza al Taglio. They create a variety of one of a kind pizzas that change frequently based on availability of the freshest ingredients.

For our last Roman sunset we visited the gardens at the Villa Medici. We recommend taking their tour at magic hour (around 6 pm) to see the beautiful golden light that’s cast on the villa and the gardens. The view of the surrounding city is one of the best.

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To learn more about Oh So Arty in Rome please click here. To book a tour in Rome please click here.

72 Hours in Northern Israel

72 Hours in Northern Israel

Oh So Arty was founded and is based in the coastal city of Tel Aviv. While we love our bustling seaside metropolis we decided to take a road trip to northern Israel to discover its arty offerings. Keep reading to hear how we spent 72 hours in the north of Israel and if you are planning a trip to Israel check out our tour options here!

The Elma

The Elma

Our long weekend began at The Elma Arts Complex and Luxury Hotel in Zichron Ya’acov. The building is a converted sanatorium designed by architect Yaacov Rechter in 1968. In addition to being a state of the art luxury hotel the Elma offers a creative program including a 450-seat concert hall, the expansive Elstein galleries and more. Art is displayed throughout the complex from the lobby to the cafe and throughout the naturally lit hallways. The interdisciplinary cultural programming at the Elma has made it a world-class center for the arts.

The Elma. Works by Sigalit Landau.

The Elma. Works by Sigalit Landau.

The hotel also offers stunning panoramic views of the surrounding Carmel mountain range and an indoor and outdoor pool as well as a full spa - this is the ultimate place to relax and detox!

The pool at The Elma

The pool at The Elma

We then travelled to the port city of Akko where the ancient and the contemporary mix perfectly to create an ideal city break destination. If you are visiting Akko a stay at the Efendi Hotel is an absolute must. It is made up of two ancient houses that have been painstakingly preserved and restored to provide a window back in time.

The Efendi Hotel

The Efendi Hotel

We enjoyed the comforts of a modern luxury hotel while immersed in history with views of the original city walls of Akko and the sea. Each room has a different style with unique details but all of them offer amazing views. We took in the breathtaking Akko sunset from the rooftop of the Efendi as we enjoyed aperitivo and good company.

Akko from the Efendi rooftop

Akko from the Efendi rooftop

When we finally tore ourselves away from the Efendi we headed to the famous Uri Buri restaurant for dinner. Founded by Uri Yirmias and located right next to the beach this restaurant serves up fresh seafood dishes with ample fine Israeli wine options.

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Beautiful ancient architecture and artifacts fill the city of Akko however it also offers some contemporary art. Galil Gallery is a must for travellers interested in art or the modern side of this city. They offer a fresh program of contemporary art and are hosting an exhibition of work by Israeli artists Inbar Frim and Moran Kliger opening this October.

work by Moran Kliger, an Israeli artist with a show opening this October at Galil Gallery.

work by Moran Kliger, an Israeli artist with a show opening this October at Galil Gallery.

Savida is another culinary hot spot located in the old city of Akko. We stopped for lunch on our way down to Haifa and stuffed ourselves with their family style dishes. In Haifa, the Baha’i Gardens and World Center were our first destination. The beautiful gardens also known as the Hanging Gardens of Haifa are impossible to miss as you enter the city and their meticulously styled and maintained designs are a visual treat. We also recommend a trip to the Haifa Museum of Art, Israel’s third largest art museum, founded in 1951 in downtown Haifa and offering a vast collection of contemporary Israeli art.

Bahai Gardens, Haifa

Bahai Gardens, Haifa

Outside the city limits of Haifa and further North, are two unique art venues worth the trip! The Museum of Art Ein-Harod located on Kibbutz Ein-Harod was one of the first art museums to be founded in Israel in 1938. This historical landmark also has rich collections of Jewish art, Israeli art and Judaica. If you are looking for something more contemporary do not miss Umm al-Fahem Gallery an Israeli-Arab art gallery in Umm al-Fahem. Approximately forty minutes outside of Haifa this gallery founded in 1996 has become an important social and cultural meeting place to discover Arab and Palestinian art.

Museum of Art Ein Harod

Museum of Art Ein Harod

Our sojourn to northern Israel inspired our team to create more immersive art tour experiences that last more than one day. Oh So Arty now offers Art Trips in Israel which will visit multiple regions including the surrounding areas of Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and Haifa. For more information and pricing please contact us at sarahpeguine@gmail.com

To read other ‘72 Hours In…’ articles please click here.


72 Hours in Antwerp

72 Hours in Antwerp


The beautiful Belgian port city of Antwerp has existed since around the 1500s and has a wealth of historical and contemporary institutions to explore. We were invited by This Is Antwerp to participate in their cheekily nicknamed ‘Antwerp bootcamp’ also known as ‘Discover Antwerp Through Experience’ or D.A.T.E. Eager to find an Oh So Arty insider in this cultural hub, we packed our bags and flew to Antwerp for an enlightening few days with other creatives, bloggers, and artists. We are looking forward to unveiling Oh So Arty in Antwerp but until then, enjoy this compilation of our favorite places from our Belgian sojourn.

Day one was a whirlwind of checking into our beautiful accommodations for the weekend at the boutique Hotel Pilar and meeting all the other individuals participating in D.A.T.E. We then prepared for a city bike ride with Cyclant. Peddling around Antwerp was the perfect way to see the city! A highlight was cycling through the impressive St. Anna’s Tunnel or ‘The Underpass’ as it is known by locals.

Biking through St. Anna's Tunnel. Photo by  Niko Caignie .

Biking through St. Anna's Tunnel. Photo by Niko Caignie.

In the evening we went to the Berchem district and toured PAKT, an old warehouse site that currently functions as a creative hub and office area that also has restaurants, bars, housing and unique events. We ended day one with drinks from The Antwerp Brew Company at Seef Brewery.

The Antwerp Brew Company at Seef Brewery .  Photo by Niko Caignie.

The Antwerp Brew Company at Seef BreweryPhoto by Niko Caignie.

To start day two we hopped back onto our bicycles and road to the open air Middelheim Museum. Located in a city park on the edge of Antwerp, the Middelheim Museum presents a large collection of modern and avant-garde installations that are free to view. During our visit we saw the exhibition Experience Traps which featured sixteen contemporary artists, who created monumental sculptures and installations that responded to the Baroque landscape of the park.

Middelheim Museum. Photo by Niko Caignie.

Middelheim Museum. Photo by Niko Caignie.

After an amazing morning in the park we biked on to MUHKA, the Museum of Contemporary Art. Like many creative partners in the city, MUHKA is participating in the Antwerp Baroque year in which throughout 2018 the city presents a program juxtaposing old and new Baroque. Their current exhibition Sanguine Expo (on view until September 16th, 2018), curated by Luc Tuymans, perfectly captured this relationship between old and new.

We made time to stop off at Plus One Gallery which represents Belgian and international artists. The gallery has two locations, one in Berchen and the second in Nieuw Zuid and is a great destination for contemporary art lovers visiting the city!

For dinner we grabbed a bite at Native Food serving organic food with authentic and locally sourced ingredients. The relaxed alfresco atmosphere makes it a perfect place to decompress after a long day of touring.

PAKT. Photo by Niko Caignie.

PAKT. Photo by Niko Caignie.

As we came to discover, you can’t visit Antwerp without immersing yourself in its rich Baroque history. A visit to the house of Peter Paul Reubens, one of the most influential Baroque painters is a must. The Rubenshuis displays several of his paintings and contains his workshop as well as a lovely courtyard. Visiting Rubenshuis will satiate art history fanatics, and give you a taste for what life was like in Antwerp at the time of Rubens.

Rubenshuis. Photo by Niko Caignie.

Rubenshuis. Photo by Niko Caignie.

Grabbing a quick breakfast bite at Sanba coffee shop we started day three at the MAS (Museum aan de Stroom or Museum at the river). Designed by the renowned Neutelings Riedijk Architects MAS was established in 2011 when older museums had to close for maintenance. MAS has something for everyone including ethnographic art, maritime art, the city’s archive and a detailed exhibition of Antwerp shipping history.

When in Belgian it is practically required to indulge in Belgian fries. Make your order upscale at Baraque Friture. Fries in hand we decided to check out the newly opened Port House, designed by world renowned architect Zaha Hadid. Hadid’s design epitomizes the dynamic identity of this port city. Contemporary art has a place at Port House too and we were awestruck by the monumental drawings of the young Belgian artist Rinus Van de Velde, currently exhibited in the space.

Port House designed by Zaha Hadid. Photo by Niko Caignie.

Port House designed by Zaha Hadid. Photo by Niko Caignie.

Our final arty stop was to the Plantin-Moretus Printing Museum named after the 16th century printing company and located in the home of its owners. As with many historical sites in Antwerp, the Plantin-Moretus museum has a connection to Rubens as the artist was a close friend of the Plantin family and some of his paintings are on display. A UNESCO World Heritage Site opened to the public in the 1880’s, this museum is a unique arty venue. During your visit make sure to check out the museum's collaborator Kastaar, a graphic design studio with a collection of historic printing material. Within their workshop Kastaar creates custom-made printing projects.

  Plantin-Moretus Printing Museum. Photo by  Niko Caignie .

 Plantin-Moretus Printing Museum. Photo by Niko Caignie.

Exhausted and inspired form our whirlwind exploration of Antwerp we sat down for dinner at Bar Noord with all of our new creative contemporaries to digest the past 72 hours. Immersed in the verdant Park Spoor Noord we sipped on spritzes and toasted this fascinating city. Stay tuned for an Oh So Arty local insider in Antwerp coming soon. If you’re interested in taking a private art tour in Brussels please click here to learn more.

We would be remiss not to mention our fantastic colleagues who joined us during these few days in Antwerp. Please check out their creative endeavors throughout Europe. Birdy Ben, Tony Skeor, Mimo Mali, and Dimitris Ladopoulos are all artists who were commissioned to create new art work for This Is Antwerp. There were also bloggers and writers in our group including: Stefania Guglielmi, Angel Trinidad, Local Lore's Réka and Adrienn, and Maximilian Prag.

A special thank you to the amazing team at This is Antwerp for inviting us and hosting us in what was an unforgettable stay and to Niko Caignie for all the beautiful pictures. 

Viewing installations commisioned from  Birdy Ben ,  Tony Skeor ,  Mimo Mali , and  Dimitris Ladopoulos . Photo by Niko Caignie.

Viewing installations commisioned from Birdy Ben, Tony Skeor, Mimo Mali, and Dimitris Ladopoulos. Photo by Niko Caignie.